PANEL VII

ANALYSING MIGRANTS’ PUBLIC MENTAL HEALTH: CITIZENSHIP, RESILIENCE,
AND THE ROLE OF RELIGION

 
 

Organisers | Önver Cetrez and Valerie Demarinis

This panel focuses on micro, meso, and macro dimensions of citizenship, belonging, resilience and religiosity as they pertain to public mental health for migrants.

The framework of a public mental health perspective incorporates a person-centered approach, which understands that resilience is present and can be nurtured in the face of difficult and persistent traumatic experiences. The perspective is in accord with the Roadmap for Mental Health in Europe (ROAMER) recommendations for public mental health research in Europe (Forsman, A. et al., 2015). This holistic approach includes cultural and existential meaning assessments for identifying potential resources for mental health and well-being as well as providing specific information on beliefs, practices, or values that might be hindering such (Silove, 2013; DeMarinis, 2014).

On the micro level the panel includes papers focusing on refugees’ experiences of citizenship and community belonging and access to regular health care services and informal health services. Some papers look at the role of religion or other meaning-making systems providing resources in daily activities, as well as refugees’ experiences of the role of family and significant others in daily living. On the meso level, papers explore mental health and psychosocial services for refugees, participation of non-state institutions in the implementation of health care, as well as cultural, gender, and contextual approaches to health care by providers. Finally, on the macro level, the panel examines reflections and research on access to citizenship rights, health care provision for refugees and access to mental health and psychosocial services.